Handmade in America

Whisker Works is proud to be an entirely-American-made small business! We use only materials and supplies that were created right here in the United States. From the plastic and rubber, to the sticks and steel, each and every prop is very much handmade in America.

We would like to share the following American vendors that we’re happy to do business with:

Mustache of the Month: The Companion!

Every month I choose a new style to be featured as the Mustache of the Month. For June, it’s the Companion. Now through the end of this month, this mustache on a stick is only $4! The Companion mustache can be found here.

Below are some of my favorite photos featuring the Companion that I have received.

Enter the Mustache

Parties didn’t always have silly mustaches to liven them up — but then again, everything has to start somewhere. Take the mustache itself. The first evidence of anyone wearing one, real or otherwise, dates back to the 4th century B.C., well before the birth of Whisker Works.

The first recorded portrait of a man with a mustache appears on a carpet from 300 B.C., now housed in the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Unintentionally inspiring Tom Selleck, Alex Trebek and countless polka-dot-winged equestrians in the process of looking fabulous.

A mustache first was photographed in 1826 in Paris, France, using a camera made primarily out of wood! Almost 100 years later, a Russian-born New Yorker created the first modern photo booth in 1925. The invention earned him $1 million.

Catapulting the artificial mustache into the mainstream, world-renown British rock band The Beatles gave away cardboard mustaches with their album “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” released in 1967. As a side note, though all four Beatles eventually grew mustaches, it started with Paul McCartney, who only grew one to hide a chipped tooth.

Perhaps inspired by the Beatles record, the mustache-on-a-stick concept gained wide appeal after being featured on The Martha Stewart Show in October 2008. Made for that program of dryer lint and fabric glue, they had a hairy realism about them. I tried to make some myself, but only made a big, gross mess.

One year later, I gave the idea another shot — this time using modeling clay. They were a hit at my own wedding, delighting guests who posed for dozens of silly photographs using disposable cameras. Months later, Whisker Works was born. It’s been my full-time job ever since, now with plastic as my medium. My name is Amber and this is my blog. Welcome. 🙂